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1 Year Diploma in Hospitality and Tourism Management (HTM)





LEARNING PROGRAM

Hospitality Today: An Introduction

PROGRAM NUMBER

HTI 103

MODE OF INSTRUCTION

ONLINE

PROGRAM DURATION

15 weeks; 450 hours

NUMBER OF CREDITS

4.0

 

 

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course takes a management perspective in introducing students to the organization and structure of hotels, restaurants, clubs, cruise ships, and casino hotels. There are chapters on business ethics, franchising, management contracts, and areas of management responsibility such as human resources, marketing and sales, and advertising.

 

II. COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Define "service" and summarize how service businesses differ from manufacturing businesses.
  2. Summarize reasons people travel and describe travel trends and types of travel research.
  3. Describe in general terms the makeup and size of the lodging and food service industries and identify advantages and disadvantages of a career in hospitality.
  4. Describe in general terms the size of the restaurant industry and list restaurant industry segments.
  5. Give examples of guest menu preferences in various parts of the United States and the rest of the world, describe menu categories, and summarize the importance of menu design and menu pricing.
  6. Explain various ways hotels can be owned and operated, distinguish chain hotels from independent hotels, and explain how hotels can be categorized by price.
  7. Distinguish a hotel's revenue centers from its cost centers.
  8. Compare equity clubs with corporate or developer clubs.
  9. List and describe types of meetings typically held in lodging facilities.
  10. Describe the development of the cruise industry and explain how a cruise ship is organized and managed.
  11. Summarize the history of gaming and describe casino hotels and casino operations.
  12. Describe the basic tasks of managers and trace the development of management theories.
  13. Identify current labor trends affecting the hospitality industry and describe elements of a good human resources program.
  14. Distinguish marketing from selling and explain how a marketing plan is developed.
  15. Explain why hotel management companies came into existence and describe elements of a typical hotel management contract.
  16. Describe types of franchises and explain how franchising works.
  17. Give examples of different viewpoints concerning morality, contrast deontology with utilitarianism, and explain the concept of ethical relativism.

 

 

III. TEXT

 

imgBook

Hospitality Today: An Introduction

This best-selling textbook, rich with full-color photos and illustrations, provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the many entities that make up the hospitality industry, as well as an overview of today’s hot issues, including ethical challenges and management concerns. Numerous examples, exhibits, and statistics give students an up-to-date look at the dynamic hospitality field.

The seventh edition features new information on:

  • Green hotels and restaurants and sustainable tourism development
  • Hotel technology, computer-based restaurant control systems, and virtual meetings
  • Application of management techniques such as Six Sigma and Balanced Scorecard
  • How the Internet, e-mail, and social media have changed hospitality marketing

# 00103CIN07ENGE
ISBN 978-0-86612-363-1 © 2011; 17 chapters, Hardbound

Author: Rocco M. Angelo, CHA, Florida International University.
Author: Andy N. Vladimir, CHE

 

IV. COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

1.       Quizzes                                                         80 %         

2.       Final Exam                                                  20%

 

V. EVALUATION/PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Course grades will be assigned as follows:

 

A+

95 - 100

B-

70 - 74

A

90 - 94

C+

65 - 69

A-

85 - 89

C

60 - 64

B+

80 - 84

C-

59 - 55

B

75 - 79

D

50 - 54

F

< 49

 

Course Outline

HTI 103Hospitality Today: An Introduction

 

This Program is divided into 15 weeks. Each week includes the following:

 

Week 1            Service Makes the Difference

 

Week 2            The Travel and Tourism Industry

                          Exploring Hospitality Careers

 

Week 3            Understanding the Restaurant Industry

 

Week 4            Restaurant Organization and Management

 

Week 5            Understanding the World of Hotels

 

Week 6            Hotel Organization and Management

 

Week 7            Club Management          

                          An Introduction to the Meetings Industry

 

Week 8            Floating Resorts: The Cruise Line Business

 

Week 9            Gaming and Casino Hotels

 

Week 10          Managing and Leading Hospitality Enterprises

                         

Week 11          Managing Human Resources

 

Week 12          Marketing Hospitality

                         

Week 13          How Management Companies Manage Hotels

 

Week 14          Franchising Is Big Business

 

Week 15          Ethics in Hospitality Management

 

 

Foundation Courses

 

LEARNING PROGRAM

Spa: A Comprehensive Introduction

PROGRAM NUMBER

SCI 120

MODE OF INSTRUCTION

ONLINE

PROGRAM DURATION

15 weeks; 450 hours

NUMBER OF CREDITS

4.0

 

 

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course introduces students to the world of spa, taking a comprehensive look at subjects ranging from the history and cultural development of spas to spa terminology and financial realities. The course takes students through a typical day from a spa director’s perspective, examines the qualities of outstanding service, and discusses industry trends and future directions.

 

II. COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe types of spas and spa-goers and explain how spa philosophy and the integration of mind, body, and spirit.
  2. Identify the development of spa practices and traditions in various world cultures throughout history.
  3. Describe the evolution of the spa industry in the past 50 years, including the development of spa-related businesses and organizations and the influence of spa on other aspects of contemporary society.
  4. Identify key social, market, technology, treatment, industry, and environmental trends in the spa industry.
  5. Explain how spas can achieve superior service by creating memorable experiences and delivering on their service promises.
  6. Identify some of the traditions from which spa therapies have emerged and describe various treatments in the areas of massage, fitness, hydrotherapy, body treatments, and skin care.
  7. Identify a spa’s revenue and cost centers and describe how each works together for the profitability of the business.
  8. Identify career opportunities in the spa industry, including advantages and disadvantages to a spa career, compensation and benefits, and opportunities for training, education, and licensing.
  9. Describe typical days in the lives of resort, destination, and day spa directors, focusing on their interactions with guests, employees, and managers/owners.
  10. Describe the importance of leadership, the strategies that ensure its success, the leadership skills that can take a spa from good to great, and the specific leadership needs of spas.
  11. Identify ethical issues that affect spas.

III. TEXT

 

imgBook

Spa: A Comprehensive Introduction

 

This introductory textbook, developed by the International SPA Association Foundation, takes an in-depth look at subjects ranging from the history and cultural development of spas to spa terminology and financial realities. It also examines today’s spa industry, and introduces students to spa careers. In addition, it takes students through a typical day from a spa director’s perspective, examines the qualities of an outstanding spa experience, and discusses industry trends and future directions. The textbook provides a strong foundation of knowledge for success in the spa industry.

# 00120CIN01ENGE
ISBN 978-0-86612-323-5 © 2008; Softbound

Author: Bridgette M. Redman
Author: Elizabeth M. Johnson

 

 

IV. COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

3.       Quizzes                                                         80 %         

4.       Final Exam                                                  20%

 

 

V. EVALUATION/PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

 

Grades will be assigned as follows:

 

A+

95-

100

B-

70 -

74

A

 90 -

94

C+

65-

69

A-

85-

89

C

60 -

64

B+

80 -

84

C-

59-

55

B

75 -

79

D

50-

54

F

< 49

 

 

Program Outline

SCI 120Spa: A Comprehensive Introduction

 

 

This Program is divided into 15 weeks. Each week includes the following:

 

Week 1            Overview and Introduction

 

Week 2            Philosophy of Spa

                         

Week 3-4         A History of Spa and Spa Cultures

 

Week 5            Contemporary Spa

 

Week 6            Contemporary Spa, continued

 

Week 7-8         Trend Analysis: Possibilities and Predictions

 

Week 9            The Spa Service Experience

                         

Week 10          Traditions, Treatments, and Terms

 

Week 11          Traditions, Treatments, and Terms, continued

 

Week 12          Financial Organization of Spas

                         

Week 13          Spa Careers, Vocations, and Professions

 

Week 14          A Day in the Life of a Spa Director

                         

Week 15          Leadership and Ethics

                         

 

 

LEARNING PROGRAM

Management of Food and Beverage Operations

PROGRAM NUMBER

MFB 241

MODE OF INSTRUCTION

ONLINE

PROGRAM DURATION

15 weeks; 450 hours

NUMBER OF CREDITS

4.0

 

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course will give students a basic understanding of the management process in food and beverage operations. All aspects of food and beverage operations are covered, including organization, marketing, menus, costs and pricing, production, service, safety, and finances.

 

II. COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Explain the difference between commercial and noncommercial food service operations, and describe examples of each.
  2. Describe the three levels of management and identify the various production and service positions in a food and beverage operation.
  3. Explain organization charts and the various organizational structures of food and beverage operations.
  4. Describe the steps involved in the management process, and describe the manager’s responsibilities to the primary and secondary groups of people with whom he or she typically interacts.
  5. Explain marketing in terms of providing guest-pleasing service, and discuss the elements and importance of feasibility studies, marketing research, and marketing plans.
  6. Discuss nutrition and special dietary concerns as they relate to the food service industry, and contrast the nutritional concerns and obligations of commercial and noncommercial operations.
  7. Describe menu pricing styles, menu schedules, menu types, and the menu planning process.
  8. Explain how the menu dictates operations in a food and beverage establishment, and describe its importance as a marketing tool.
  9. Explain how to create and use standard recipes.
  10. Determine standard food and beverage costs, and describe the main subjective and objective pricing methods.
  11. Describe the roles purchasing, receiving, storing, and issuing play in food and beverage service, and describe the role of technology in these processes.
  12. Explain how technology is affecting food and beverage advertising and changing the way guests place food and beverage orders.
  13. Identify the major functions and basic principles of food production.
  14. Describe the uses of and major production methods for various food products used in food service operations.
  15. Identify and describe the types of service that food and beverage operations can provide, and explain how to provide excellent guest service.
  16. Identify environmental construction and production strategies that will help food and beverage operations address sustainability concerns.
  17. Describe procedures for serving alcoholic beverages with care.
  18. Identify causes of and ways to prevent accidents and foodborne illnesses in food service operations.
  19. Describe the factors involved in facility design and equipment selection for a food and beverage operation.
  20. Explain and describe the various financial statements and ratios used in food and beverage operations.
  21. Describe the types of financial management software that are available to food service managers.

 

 

III. TEXT

 

imgBook

Management of Food and Beverage Operations

Give your students the foundation they need to make smart decisions in food and beverage operations. The book addresses ways in which food and beverage operations have adapted management and operating tactics from other industries, what operations are doing to maintain or improve quality standards while reducing expenses, and how high-tech strategies are being used to give customers greater value for their dining dollars. Changes to this edition include technology-related updates throughout the text, an expanded discussion of marketing channels and tactics used by food service managers, information on sustainability issues in food service, and discussion of nutrition issues including menu labeling legislation, organic foods, food allergies, and the obesity problem in the United States.

# 00241CIN05ENGE
ISBN 978-0-86612-344-0 © 2010; 13 chapters, Softbound

Author: Jack D. Ninemeier, Ph.D., CHA, CFBE, CHE

 

IV. COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

5.       Quizzes                                                         80 %         

6.       Final Exam                                                  20%

 

V. EVALUATION/PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Course grades will be assigned as follows:

 

A+

95 - 100

B-

70 - 74

A

90 - 94

C+

65 - 69

A-

85 - 89

C

60 - 64

B+

80 - 84

C-

59 - 55

B

75 - 79

D

50 - 54

F

< 49

 

 

Course Outline

MFB 241Management of Food and Beverage Operations

 

This Program is divided into 15 weeks. Each week includes the following:

 

Week 1            The Food Service Industry

Week 2

 

Week 3            Organization of Food and Beverage Operations

 

Week 4            Fundamentals of Management

 

Week 5            Food and Beverage Marketing

 

Week 6            Nutrition for Food Service Operations

 

Week 7            The Menu

 

Week 8            Standard Product Costs and Pricing Strategies

 

Week 9            Preparing for Production

 

Week 10          Production

 

Week 11          Food and Beverage Service

                         

Week 12          Sanitation and Safety

 

Week 13          Facility Design, Layout, and Equipment

Week 14

                         

Week 15          Financial Management

 

 

Foundation Courses

LEARNING PROGRAM

Supervision in the Hospitality Industry

PROGRAM NUMBER

SHI 250

MODE OF INSTRUCTION

ONLINE

PROGRAM DURATION

15 weeks; 450 hours

NUMBER OF CREDITS

4.0

 

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is designed to provide students with the principles of supervision as they apply specifically to the hospitality industry.

 

II. COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Identify fundamental supervisory responsibilities.
  2. Explain the steps that supervisors can take to speak effectively on the job.
  3. Describe how supervisors work with the human resources department to recruit new employees.
  4. Explain the function of training within an organization and the supervisor's role in training.
  5. Forecast business volume using the base adjustment forecasting method and the moving average forecasting method.
  6. Distinguish coaching from counseling and disciplining.
  7. Identify the components of a progressive disciplinary program.
  8. List important laws and legal concerns that affect hospitality supervisors.
  9. Describe issues supervisors should be aware of as they assume the role of team leader.
  10. Explain how supervisors can increase employee participation in department activities.
  11. Identify steps supervisors should follow during a meeting with employees in conflict.
  12. Distinguish high-priority interruptions from low-priority interruptions, and summarize strategies for dealing with the latter.
  13. Describe actions that supervisors can take to minimize employee resistance to change.
  14. Explain why it is important for supervisors to take control of their personal development, and describe how to execute a career development plan.

 

III. TEXT

 

imgBook

Supervision in the Hospitality Industry

Help aspiring hospitality supervisors hit the ground running with the skills they’ll learn in this book. They will be prepared to juggle with expectations of management, guests, employees, and governmental agencies. New case studies help students practice solving problems they may face on the job. This textbook also provides resources to help students create a professional development plan for their hospitality career.

# 00250CIN04ENGE
ISBN 978-0-86612-295-5 © 2007; 14 chapters, Softbound

Author: Raphael R. Kavanaugh, Ed.D., CHA, Purdue University

 

IV. COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

7.       Quizzes                                                                  20 %

8.       Assignments                                                80 %                                                              

 

V. EVALUATION/PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Course grades will be assigned as follows:

 

A+

95 - 100

B-

70 - 74

A

90 - 94

C+

65 - 69

A-

85 - 89

C

60 - 64

B+

80 - 84

C-

59 - 55

B

75 - 79

D

50 - 54

F

< 49

 

Course Outline

SHI 250Supervision in the Hospitality Industry

 

This Program is divided into 15 weeks. Each week includes the following:

 

Week 1            The Supervisor and the Management Process

 

Week 2            Effective Communication

 

Week 3            Recruitment and Selection Procedures

 

Week 4            Training and Orientation

 

Week 5            Managing Productivity and Controlling Labor Costs

 

Week 6            Evaluating and Coaching

 

Week 7            Discipline

 

Week 8            Special Supervisory Concerns

 

Week 9            Team Building

 

Week 10          Motivation Through Leadership

                         

Week 11          Managing Conflict

 

Week 12          Time Management

                         

Week 13          Managing Change

 

Week 14          Professional Development

Week 15

 

 

LEARNING PROGRAM

Hospitality Industry Financial Accounting

PROGRAM NUMBER

HFA 260

MODE OF INSTRUCTION

ONLINE

PROGRAM DURATION

15 weeks; 450 hours

NUMBER OF CREDITS

4.0

 

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course presents basic financial accounting concepts and explains how they apply to the hospitality industry.

 

II. COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the accounting process and the roles that accountants play in collecting and presenting financial information..
  2. Define the major classifications of accounts (assets, liabilities, equity, revenue, and expenses) and describe specific accounts found within each classification.
  3. Understand the correct application of debits and credits by analyzing business transactions for a variety of accounting situations.
  4. Discuss the basis of the double-entry accounting system and identify the normal balances of the various types of accounts.
  5. Describe the posting, journalizing, and closing processes.
  6. Identify the purposes and characteristics of specialized journals and subsidiary ledgers.
  7. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the sole proprietorship, the partnership, the corporation, and the S corporation, and describe and compare accounting procedures for each.
  8. Discuss generally accepted accounting principles and explain the usefulness of each.
  9. Distinguish between cash basis accounting and accrual accounting.
  10. List procedures that help ensure internal control of a firm's cash.
  11. Discuss how hospitality firms account for bad debt losses.
  12. Describe accounting procedures involved in notes receivable and notes payable.
  13. Discuss methods of controlling and accounting for inventory.
  14. Identify and define the major classifications of adjusting entries reversing entries.
  15. Define ten steps of the accounting cycle.
  16. Describe the balance sheet, the income statement, the statement of owners' equity, the statement of retained earnings, and the statement of cash flows, and discuss the purposes of each.
  17. Identify the uniform systems of accounts relevant to the hospitality industry.
  18. Explain the purposes of footnotes to financial statements.
  19. Identify and describe commonly used depreciation methods.
  20. Describe accounting procedures used for property, equipment, intangible assets, and other assets.
  21. Describe procedures used to account for current liabilities and payroll.
  22. Describe procedures used to account for bonds, leases, and mortgages payable.
  23. Explain why hospitality firms invest in the securities of other companies, and discuss accounting for investments
  24. Identify the kinds of information obtained through vertical and horizontal analyses of comparative balance sheets and comparative income statements.
  25. Explain ratio analysis and the purposes that it serves for managers, creditors, and investors.
  26. Identify and define five classes of ratios and explain their significance.

 

 

III. TEXT

 

imgBook

Hospitality Industry Financial Accounting

This textbook presents basic financial accounting concepts and shows your students how they apply to the hospitality industry. This revised edition incorporates the most recent formats, information, and schedules from the newly-published Uniform Systems of Accounts for the Lodging Industry, Tenth Revised Edition. Each chapter also includes five new problems to give students practice using accounting information.

Students will learn:

  • The responsibilities of a hospitality property's accounting department
  • Advantages and drawbacks of various types of income statements
  • The role of inventory in calculating profit

 

# 00260TXT03ENGE
ISBN 978-0-86612-284-9 © 2006; 18 chapters, Softbound

Author: Raymond S. Schmidgall, Ph.D., CPA, Michigan State University.
Author: James W. Damitio, Ph.D., CMA, Central Michigan University

 

IV. COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

9.       Quizzes                                                         80 %         

10.    Final Exam                                                  20%

 

V. EVALUATION/PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Course grades will be assigned as follows:

 

A+

95 - 100

B-

70 - 74

A

90 - 94

C+

65 - 69

A-

85 - 89

C

60 - 64

B+

80 - 84

C-

59 - 55

B

75 - 79

D

50 - 54

F

< 49

 

 

Course Outline

HFA 260Hospitality Industry Financial Accounting

 

This Program is divided into 15 weeks. Each week includes the following:

 

Week 1            Introduction to Accounting

 

Week 2            Accounting for Business Transactions

 

Week 3            Accounting Adjustments

 

Week 4            Completing the Accounting Cycle

Week 5            Income Statement

 

Week 6            Balance Sheet

 

Week 7            Specialized Journals and Subsidiary Ledgers

 

Week 8            Cash

                          Receivables and Payables

 

Week 9            Inventory
                          Property, Equipment, and Other Assets

 

Week 10          Current Liabilities and Payroll

 

Week 11          Partnerships

 

Week 12          Corporate Accounting

                         

Week 13          Bonds, Leases, and Mortgages Payable
                          Investments in Corporate Securities

 

Week 14          Statement of Cash Flows

                         

Week 15          Analysis and Interpretation of Financial Statement

 

 

LEARNING PROGRAM

Leadership and Management in the Hospitality Industry

PROGRAM NUMBER

LMH 304

MODE OF INSTRUCTION

ONLINE

PROGRAM DURATION

15 weeks; 450 hours

NUMBER OF CREDITS

4.0

 

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is designed to acquaint students with leadership, management, and quality issues facing today's hospitality industry. There are chapters on managing organizational change, traditional management roles and styles versus leadership in the twenty-first century, quality management, continuous improvement, power and empowerment, communication skills, goal setting and coaching, high-performance teams, diversity, strategic career planning, and ethics

 

II. COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. List tips and cautions for organizations that embark on large-scale organizational change, and describe the four major steps of the change process.
  2. Describe the traditional functions of management (planning, organizing, coordinating, staffing, directing, and controlling), and explain why a gap exists between them and the actual behavior of managers.
  3. Describe the dominant contemporary views of leadership.
  4. Summarize William Edwards Deming's 14 points for management and describe his ideas about leadership and management.\
  5. Describe Joseph Juran's notions and definitions of quality and detail the basic elements of quality management using Juran's approach.
  6. Explain the four fundamental steps of a continuous-improvement process, and identify and describe tools commonly used in the process.
  7. Describe the types and sources of organizational and personal power, the typical responses to each type of power, and methods to enhance power and build alliances.
  8. Identify seven myths about communication, outline the communication process, and describe barriers to effective communication.
  9. Explain the importance and nature of goal-setting in an organization, describe the nature of and need for coaching in today's hospitality organizations, and list guidelines that can help managers handle organizational conflict.
  10. Describe forces of change that have made team-building a high priority for many hospitality organizations, and describe the stages a work team goes through during its development.
  11. Identify the ways in which the work force is changing and how it is becoming more diverse.
  12. Explain how organizations can foster diversity in the workplace.
  13. Create a personal vision statement after analyzing your skills, interests, values, and personality type; and identify ways to choose an occupation and implement your career choice.
  14. Discuss ethics and identify common ethical issues in the hospitality industry.

 

 

III. TEXT

 

imgBook

Leadership and Management in the Hospitality Industry

 

Students will learn how to improve their leadership abilities and develop an understanding of high-performance teams and employee empowerment. New information will provide students with an understanding of diversity and cultural change. Practical information prepares them to put management tools into action to enhance service and boost business.

 

# 00304CIN03ENGE
ISBN 978-0-86612-347-1 © 2010; 11 chapters, Softbound

Author: Robert H. Woods, Ph.D., CHRE, University of Nevada, Las Vegas.
Author: Judy Z. King, President, Quality Management Services

 

IV. COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

11.    Quizzes                                                         80 %         

12.    Final Exam                                                  20%

 

V. EVALUATION/PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Course grades will be assigned as follows:

 

A+

95 - 100

B-

70 - 74

A

90 - 94

C+

65 - 69

A-

85 - 89

C

60 - 64

B+

80 - 84

C-

59 - 55

B

75 - 79

D

50 - 54

F

< 49

 

 

Course Outline

LMH 304Leadership and Management in the Hospitality Industry

 

This Program is divided into 15 weeks. Each week includes the following:

 

Week 1            Course Introduction

 

Week 2            Managing Organizational Change

 

Week 3            The Changing Nature of Leadership and Management

 

Week 4            The Quest for Quality

 

Week 5            Continuous Improvement—Process and Tools

 

Week 6            Power and Empowerment

 

Week 7            Communication Skills

Week 8           

 

Week 9            Goal-Setting, Coaching, and Conflict-Management Skills            

 

Week 10          High-Performance Teams

Week 11

 

Week 12          The Challenge of Diversity

 

Week 13          Strategic Career Planning

Week 14

 

Week 15     A Look at Ethics

 

LEARNING PROGRAM

Managing Front Office Operations

PROGRAM NUMBER

MFO 333

MODE OF INSTRUCTION

ONLINE

PROGRAM DURATION

15 weeks; 450 hours

NUMBER OF CREDITS

4.0

 

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course presents a systematic approach to front office procedures by detailing the flow of business through a hotel, from the reservations process to check-out and account settlement. The course also examines the various elements of effective front office management, paying particular attention to the planning and evaluation of front office operations and to human resources management. Front office procedures and management are placed within the context of the overall operation of a hotel.

 

II. COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Classify hotels in terms of their ownership, affiliation, and levels of service.
  2. Describe how hotels are organized and explain how functional areas within hotels are classified.
  3. Summarize front office operations during the four stages of the guest cycle.
  4. Discuss the sales dimension of the reservations process and identify the tools managers use to track and control reservations.
  5. List the seven steps of the registration process and discuss creative registration options.
  6. Identify typical service requests that guests make at the front desk.
  7. Explain important issues in developing and managing a security program.
  8. Describe the process of creating and maintaining front office accounts.
  9. Identify functions and procedures related to the check-out and account settlement process.
  10. Discuss typical cleaning responsibilities of the housekeeping department.
  11. Summarize the steps in the front office audit process.
  12. Apply the ratios and formulas managers use to forecast room availability.
  13. Explain the concept of revenue management and discuss how managers can maximize revenue by using forecast information in capacity management, discount allocation, and duration control.
  14. Identify the steps in effective hiring and orientation.

 

 

III. TEXT

 

imgBook

Managing Front Office Operations

This best-selling textbook provides students with an in-depth look at management of the front office and how this department interacts with other hotel departments to create a memorable guest experience. The eighth edition been revised with new material on the potential impact of automated information technologies on a variety of front office functions. This edition also includes new information on revenue managers, how blogging and social networking affect hotels, manual backup procedures for automated system failure, identity theft prevention, payment card security standards, and green hotels. In addition, important discussions of front office operations have been expanded throughout the text, especially with respect to human resources management, business forecasting, revenue management, budget planning, and front office staff interaction with sales, housekeeping, and security personnel.

This textbook now comes packaged with Front Office Manager, a 10-module, interactive online program that provides an overview of the organization and management for the front office. Users will love the self-paced, discovery-driven approach that puts them in control as they explore each area of the hotel and click on highlighted objects to learn about each facet of front office operations. Students will have six-month access to the online program.

 

# 00333CIN08ENGEOC
ISBN 978-0-86612-382-2 © 2009; 14 chapters, Softbound

Author: Michael L. Kasavana, Ph.D., Michigan State University
Author: Richard M. Brooks, CHA, Consultant, The TWE Group

 

IV. COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

13.    Quizzes                                                         80 %         

14.    Final Exam                                                  20%

 

V. EVALUATION/PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Course grades will be assigned as follows:

 

A+

95 - 100

B-

70 - 74

A

90 - 94

C+

65 - 69

A-

85 - 89

C

60 - 64

B+

80 - 84

C-

59 - 55

B

75 - 79

D

50 - 54

F

< 49

 

 

Course Outline

MFO 333Managing Front Office Operations

 

This Program is divided into 15 weeks. Each week includes the following:

 

Week 1            The Lodging Industry

 

Week 2            Hotel Organization

 

Week 3            Front Office Operations

 

Week 4            Reservations

 

Week 5            Registration

 

Week 6            Communications and Guest Services

 

Week 7            Security and the Lodging Industry

 

Week 8            Front Office Accounting

 

Week 9            Check-Out and Account Settlement

 

Week 10          The Role of Housekeeping in Hospitality Operations

                         

Week 11          The Front Office Audit

 

Week 12          Planning and Evaluating Operations

                         

Week 13          Revenue Management

 

Week 14          Managing Human Resources

Week 15         

 

 

LEARNING PROGRAM

Managing Housekeeping Operations

PROGRAM NUMBER

MHO 338

MODE OF INSTRUCTION

ONLINE

PROGRAM DURATION

15 weeks; 450 hours

NUMBER OF CREDITS

4.0

 

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is designed to provide students with the principles of housekeeping management as they apply specifically to the hospitality industry.

 

II. COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Identify the role of housekeeping in a hospitality operation.
  2. Explain how to follow environmentally sound procedures for sustainable housekeeping.
  3. Describe how to plan and organize the work of the hospitality housekeeping department.
  4. Explain the role executive housekeepers play in managing such human resource concerns as diversity, turnover, recruitment, selection, training, scheduling, and motivation.
  5. Explain how to manage inventories for linens, uniforms, guest loan items, machines and equipment, cleaning supplies, and guest supplies.
  6. Describe how an executive housekeeper budgets and controls expenses.
  7. Identify important security concerns and the role that the members of the housekeeping department play in creating a safe and secure property.
  8. Trace the flow of laundry through an on-premises laundry and describe the function of each machine.
  9. Describe the routine of guestroom cleaning from room assignments through inspections and turndown service.
  10. List the public space areas that the housekeeping department is responsible for cleaning and the tasks associated with each one.
  11. List the types of materials used for ceilings, walls, furniture, and fixtures and how to properly care for them.
  12. Describe the selection and care considerations for beds, linens, and uniforms.
  13. Explain the proper ways to clean and maintain different types of carpeting and floors.
  14. Identify major areas of a guest bathroom and how to select and care for each element.

 

 

III. TEXT

 

imgBook

Managing Housekeeping Operations

Housekeeping is critical to the success of today's hospitality operations. The third edition of this textbook shows what it takes to direct day-to-day operations of this department, from big-picture management issues to technical details for cleaning each area. This edition has been completely revised with more than 100 pages of new content and two new chapters, reflecting the extensive changes in the hotel industry. New and updated information includes the following topics:

  • Energy management, sustainability and "green" housekeeping (microfiber mops, reusing linens/towels, chemical use, green lighting, etc.)
  • Post 9/11 security issues
  • Health concerns (bedbugs, mold, viral outbreaks)
  • Amenities and guestroom furnishings (bathrobes, triple sheeting, higher thread counts, "bed wars," pillow menus, wireless Internet, etc.)
  • Human resources (diversity, recruitment challenges, immigration reform laws, turnover, selection and interviewing)

This course now comes packaged with an online component that provides additional, interactive material to reinforce the book's content. This online component includes video clips from AHLEI's training resources, short quizzes, definitions, links to relevant websites, interactive exercises, and industry news. Students will have six-month access to the online program.

 

# 00338CIN03ENGEOC
ISBN 978-0-86612-383-9 © 2008; 14 chapters, Softbound

Author: Aleta A. Nitschke,The Rooms Chronicle
Author: William D. Frye

 

IV. COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

15.    Quizzes                                                         80 %         

16.    Final Exam                                                  20%

 

V. EVALUATION/PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Course grades will be assigned as follows:

 

A+

95 - 100

B-

70 - 74

A

90 - 94

C+

65 - 69

A-

85 - 89

C

60 - 64

B+

80 - 84

C-

59 - 55

B

75 - 79

D

50 - 54

F

< 49

 

 

Course Outline

MHO 338Managing Housekeeping Operations

 

This Program is divided into 15 weeks. Each week includes the following:

 

Week 1            The Role of Housekeeping in Hospitality Operations

 

Week 2            Environmental and Energy Management

                         

Week 3            Planning and Organizing the Housekeeping Department

 

Week 4            Housekeeping Human Resource Issues

 

Week 5            Managing Inventories

 

Week 6            Controlling Expenses

 

Week 7            Safety and Security

                         

Week 8            Managing an On-Premises Laundry

 

Week 9            Guestroom Cleaning

 

Week 10          Public Area and Other Types of Cleaning

                         

Week 11          Ceilings, Walls, Furniture, and Fixtures

 

Week 12          Beds, Linens, and Uniforms

                         

Week 13          Carpets and Floors

                         

Week 14          Tubs, Toilets, and Vanities

Week 15         

 

 

LEARNING PROGRAM

Managing Hospitality Human Resources

PROGRAM NUMBER

MHR 357

MODE OF INSTRUCTION

ONLINE

PROGRAM DURATION

15 weeks; 450 hours

NUMBER OF CREDITS

4.0

 

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course presents a systematic approach to human resources management in the hospitality industry. Students will analyze contemporary issues and practices, as well as employment laws that have an impact on the way people are managed.

 

II. COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Describe the EEOC and distinguish between EEO laws and affirmative action.
  2. Define "disability," and describe the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its implications for human resource managers at hospitality operations.
  3. Explain the importance of job analysis and job design.
  4. Apply methods for forecasting labor demand, identify the advantages and disadvantages of internal and external recruiting, and explain the functions of a computer-based Human Resource Information System (HRIS).
  5. Describe the importance of the selection process, explain how managers use application forms and pre-employment tests as selection tools, and identify the types of selection errors and biases managers must overcome when screening job applicants.
  6. Explain the purpose of an orientation program, distinguish between a general property orientation and a specific job orientation, and identify specific socialization strategies and approaches.
  7. Identify and explain the stages of the training cycle, and describe various training methods.
  8. Describe the functions of performance appraisals, describe commonly used methods of appraising performance, and identify legal issues relating to performance appraisals.
  9. Describe types of compensation, and outline the major influences on compensation plans.
  10. Explain the steps and identify options for establishing pay structures, and describe current issues in compensation administration.
  11. Describe effective incentive programs and identify four general categories of employee benefits.
  12. Summarize the reasons employees join unions, analyze the statistics and trends of union membership, and explain the goals and content of major U.S. legislation affecting labor relations.
  13. Identify mandatory, voluntary, and illegal collective bargaining issues and common economic and non-economic reasons behind bargaining.
  14. Identify major sources of grievances, describe typical grievance procedures, and outline how to prevent grievances at union properties.
  15. Summarize the history, scope, and goal of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, and describe the enforcement of OSHA standards and requirements.
  16. Describe the components and benefits of an employee assistance program (EAP).
  17. Identify sources and consequences of workplace stress, and outline the implications of such issues as AIDS, depression, workplace smoking, and wellness programs.
  18. Outline the hospitality industry's turnover problem, identify the causes and costs of turnover, and summarize several methods for reducing turnover.
  19. Summarize approaches to employee discipline and explain the proper use of discipline in a hospitality organization.
  20. Describe the appropriate use of discharge in an employee discipline program and outline an effective exit interview system.
  21. Summarize ethical issues in business, including how businesses can assess ethical behavior, recent ethical issues in American business, and ethical issues in human resources management.

 

 

III. TEXT

 

imgBook

Managing Hospitality Human Resources

Hospitality is a people industry, and this textbook will show students how to manage the important human resources who provide services within a hospitality operation. They'll learn how to fulfill the requirements of U.S. employment and workplace laws, and discover the latest strategies for attracting employees, minimizing turnover, and maximizing productivity. The new edition has been revised to reflect changing economic conditions and industry trends.

Updated content in the fifth edition includes:

  • The impact of the post-recession economy on recruiting, selection, retention, and turnover
  • How companies use social media to learn about job applicants
  • The latest trends in effective incentive programs and industry benefits
  • The changing face of unions and new trends in organizing and collective bargaining
  • Social responsibility issues, including what companies are doing (and not doing) right

New! This textbook is also available with an optional key code that will provide access to an online component that presents additional, interactive material to reinforce the book's content. This online component includes video clips, short quizzes and case studies, definitions, links to relevant websites, interactive exercises, and industry news. Individuals will have six-month access to the online component.

 

# 00357CIN05ENGE
ISBN 978-0-86612-396-9 (ISBN for version with online component: ISBN 978-0-86612-380-8) © 2012; 14 chapters , Softbound

Author: Robert H. Woods, Ph.D., CHRE, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Author: Misty M. Johanson, Ph.D., DePaul University
Author: Michael P. Sciarini, Ph.D., Grand Valley State University

 

IV. COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

17.    Quizzes                                                         80 %         

18.    Final Exam                                                  20%

 

V. EVALUATION/PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Course grades will be assigned as follows:

 

A+

95 - 100

B-

70 - 74

A

90 - 94

C+

65 - 69

A-

85 - 89

C

60 - 64

B+

80 - 84

C-

59 - 55

B

75 - 79

D

50 - 54

F

< 49

 

 

Course Outline

MHR 357Managing Hospitality Human Resources

 

This Program is divided into 15 weeks. Each week includes the following:

 

Week 1            Employment Laws and Applications

 

Week 2            Job Analysis and Job Design

 

Week 3            Planning and Recruiting

 

Week 4            Selection

 

Week 5            Orientation and Socialization

 

Week 6            Training and Development

 

Week 7            Evaluating Employee Performance

 

Week 8            Compensation Administration

 

Week 9            Incentive and Benefits Administration

 

Week 10          Labor Unions

                         

Week 11          Negotiation and Collective Bargaining

 

Week 12          Health, Safety, and EAPs

                         

Week 13          Turnover, Discipline, and Exits

 

Week 14          Social Responsibility and Ethics

Week 15         

 

 

LEARNING PROGRAM

Security and Loss Prevention

PROGRAM NUMBER

SLP 387

MODE OF INSTRUCTION

ONLINE

PROGRAM DURATION

15 weeks; 450 hours

NUMBER OF CREDITS

4.0

 

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

Explains the issues surrounding the need for individualized security programs, examines a wide variety of security and safety equipment and procedures, discusses guest protection and internal security for asset protection, explores risk management and loss prevention issues, and outlines OSHA regulations that apply to lodging properties.

 

II. COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Discuss legal concerns in providing safe and secure accommodations for guests.
  2. Identify preliminary considerations in setting up a security program, including the importance of law enforcement liaison and security training.
  3. State the various methods of security staffing, noting the potential strengths and weaknesses of each method.
  4. Identify and explain the functions of a wide variety of security equipment, including physical security systems, surveillance systems, communication systems, alarm systems, and guestroom security equipment such as locks.
  5. Identify and explain the purposes of security procedures that deal with guest protection and internal control. Procedures are discussed generally and on a department-by-department basis, with special emphasis placed on handling special guests and events.
  6. Explain the value of and procedures for accurate report writing and recordkeeping.
  7. Discuss the elements of and need for protecting the accounting function, including accounting control and cashiering procedures, credit policies, computer security, and an internal audit program.
  8. Contribute to the development of an emergency management program that deals with bombs and bomb threats, fires, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, earthquakes, blackouts, robberies, medical emergencies, terrorism, and working effectively with the media in the event of an emergency situation.
  9. Discuss the elements of a risk management program, appropriate insurance coverage for lodging operations, claims management, and the importance of an ongoing safety committee.
  10. Identify many Occupational Safety and Health Act regulations that contain information important to lodging property managers and personnel.

 

III. TEXT

 

imgBook

Security and Loss Prevention Management

Prepare your students to handle vital risk management issues in the hospitality workplace. Includes safety and security case studies developed with industry professionals; links to Internet-based, hospitality-specific resources for safety and security; and dozens of exhibits and updated sample forms and documents. Sections include information on working with an in-house safety committee, crisis communications, and the importance of safety equipment to loss-prevention management.

 

# 00387CSB02
ISBN 978-86612-178-1 © 1999; 7 chapters, Softbound

Author: Raymond C. Ellis, Jr., CHE, University of Houston

 

IV. COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

19.    Quizzes                                                         80 %         

20.    Final Exam                                                  20%

 

 

V. EVALUATION/PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Course grades will be assigned as follows:

 

A+

95 - 100

B-

70 - 74

A

90 - 94

C+

65 - 69

A-

85 - 89

C

60 - 64

B+

80 - 84

C-

59 - 55

B

75 - 79

D

50 - 54

F

< 49

 

Course Outline

SLP 387Security and Loss Prevention

 

This Program is divided into 15 weeks. Each week includes the following:

 

Week 1            Course Introduction

 

Week 2            Security and the Lodging Industry

 

Week 3            Security and the Lodging Industry

 

Week 4            Security Equipment

 

Week 5            Security Equipment

 

Week 6            Security Procedures Covering Guest Concerns

 

Week 7            Security Procedures Covering Guest Concerns

 

Week 8            Departmental Responsibilities in Guest and Asset Protection

 

Week 9            Departmental Responsibilities in Guest and Asset Protection

 

Week 10          The Protection of Funds

 

Week 11          Emergency Management

 

Week 12          Emergency Management

 

Week 13          Risk Management and Insurance

 

Week 15          Risk Management and Insurance

 

 

LEARNING PROGRAM

Hospitality Sales and Marketing

PROGRAM NUMBER

HSM 472

MODE OF INSTRUCTION

ONLINE

PROGRAM DURATION

15 weeks; 450 hours

NUMBER OF CREDITS

4.0

 

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is designed to provide students with a solid background in hospitality sales and marketing. The textbook’s main focus is on practical sales techniques for selling to targeted markets.

 

II. COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Distinguish marketing from sales and identify trends that affect marketing and sales in the hospitality industry.
  2. Identify and describe the key steps of a marketing plan.
  3. Summarize the duties and responsibilities of positions typically found in a hotel marketing and sales office.
  4. Describe the five steps of a presentation sales call.
  5. Explain the basics of effective telephone communication and describe various types of outgoing and incoming telephone calls related to the marketing and sales function.
  6. Describe internal marketing and sales.
  7. Explain the role of advertising, public relations, and publicity in reaching prospective guests.
  8. Summarize how hospitality properties are meeting the needs of business travelers.
  9. Explain how hospitality properties are meeting the needs of leisure travelers.
  10. Describe travel agencies and the travelers they serve.
  11. Summarize how hotels market and sell to meeting planners.
  12. Identify considerations for marketing hospitality products and services to international travelers and other special segments such as honeymooners, sports teams, and government travelers.
  13. Summarize trends affecting the food and beverage industry, and describe positioning strategies and techniques for restaurants and lounges
  14. Explain how hotels market and sell catered events and meeting rooms.

 

 

III. TEXT

 

imgBook

Hospitality Sales and Marketing

In today’s highly-competitive hospitality market, it is essential to have an understanding of sales and marketing. This textbook goes beyond theory to focus on a customer-oriented and practical approach for effectively marketing hotels and restaurants. The book explores the “four Ps” (price, product, promotion, and place) as they relate to specific market segments, providing students with a customer-focused perspective. This edition includes several new exhibits, including profiles of key industry innovators, corporate spotlights of hotel and restaurant companies, and Internet exercises. Examples of forms, checklists, charts, and other items used by practicing hospitality sales and marketing professionals provide students with resources they can use in their careers. In addition, the Internet’s increasing role in sales and marketing is explored in new sections on social media and social networks, using the Internet to build brand awareness, and sales and marketing in the Web 2.0 world.

Students will gain:

  • A thorough introduction to hospitality sales and marketing
  • Insight from numerous real-world examples of effective hospitality advertising campaigns and promotions
  • Insider information from industry professionals sharing their perspectives on current issues in hospitality sales and marketing
  • An understanding of the role the Internet plays in today’s hospitality marketing efforts

 

# 00472CIN05ENGE
ISBN 978-0-86612-325-9 © 2008; Softbound

Author: James R. Abbey, Ph.D., CHA, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

 

IV. COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

21.    Quizzes                                                         80 %         

22.    Final Exam                                                  20%

 

V. EVALUATION/PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Course grades will be assigned as follows:

 

A+

95 - 100

B-

70 - 74

A

90 - 94

C+

65 - 69

A-

85 - 89

C

60 - 64

B+

80 - 84

C-

59 - 55

B

75 - 79

D

50 - 54

F

< 49

 

Course Outline

HSM 472Hospitality Sales and Marketing

 

This Program is divided into 15 weeks. Each week includes the following:

 

Week 1            Introduction to Hospitality Marketing and Sales

 

Week 2            The Marketing Plan: The Cornerstone of Sales

 

Week 3            Managing the Marketing and Sales Office

 

Week 4            Personal Sales

 

Week 5            Telephone Sales

 

Week 6            Internal Marketing and Sales

 

Week 7            Advertising, Public Relations, and Publicity

 

Week 8            Marketing to Business Travelers

 

Week 9            Marketing to Leisure Travelers

 

Week 10          Marketing to Travel Agents

 

Week 11          Marketing to Meeting Planners

 

Week 12          Marketing to Special Segments

 

Week 13          Marketing Restaurants and Lounges

 

Week 14          Marketing Catered Events and Meeting Rooms

Week 15         

 

 

LEARNING PROGRAM

Hospitality Facilities Management and Design

PROGRAM NUMBER

HFM 281

MODE OF INSTRUCTION

ONLINE

PROGRAM DURATION

15 weeks; 450 hours

NUMBER OF CREDITS

4.0

 

I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

Provides hospitality managers and students with information they need to know to manage the physical plant of a hotel or restaurant and work effectively with the engineering and maintenance department.

 

II. COURSE OBJECTIVES

At the completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Identify a number of important roles played by hospitality facilities, the two primary categories of facility operating costs, the components of each category, and various factors that affect those costs.
  2. Describe several types of maintenance, state the goals of maintenance management systems, and describe computerized and Internet-based facilities management.
  3. Identify the basic facilities-related concerns associated with guestrooms and corridors, public space, recreation and exterior areas, back-of-the-house areas, and the building's structure and exterior.
  4. Describe sustainability and its role in the overall business strategy of a hospitality operation, and state some of the principal measures facilities managers can take to minimize and manage waste.
  5. Describe how to reduce occupational injury rates in the hospitality industry and outline how building design and maintenance affect safety.
  6. Outline water usage levels and patterns in the lodging industry, and describe the basic structure of water and wastewater systems.
  7. Explain various aspects and components of electrical systems, cite important considerations regarding system design and operating standards, and identify elements of an effective electrical system and equipment maintenance program.
  8. Describe the basic elements of human comfort and how HVAC systems affect this comfort.
  9. Define basic lighting terms, explain how natural light can be used to meet a building's lighting needs, and describe common artificial light sources.
  10. Describe laundry equipment and explain factors in selecting laundry equipment and locating an on-premises laundry.
  11. Describe food preparation equipment, cooking equipment, and sanitation equipment.
  12. Describe the nature of and typical problems associated with a building’s structure, finishes, and exterior facilities, including the roof, exterior walls, windows and doors, structural frame, foundation, elevators, parking areas, storm water drainage systems, utilities, and landscaping and grounds.
  13. Summarize the hotel development process.
  14. Explain the concept development process for food service facilities, outline the makeup and responsibilities of the project planning team, and describe food service facility layout.
  15. List typical reasons for renovating a hotel, summarize the life cycle of a hotel, and describe types of renovation.

 

 

III. TEXT

 

imgBook

Hospitality Facilities Management and Design, Third Edition

This detailed textbook shows students how to keep every area of a hotel property running smoothly. The book takes a systems approach to hospitality facilities issues, while also providing a summary based on functional spaces within a property. This revised edition features the latest information on facilities management and design issues. Students will learn how technology can streamline operations procedures, how to balance environmental concerns with guest satisfaction, and how to communicate effectively with hotel engineering personnel.

Revisions include:

  • Thoroughly updated statistics
  • Information updated to reflect current developments and trends
  • Many new and improved exhibits
  • Many practical examples highlighted in special features
  • Case studies at the end of several chapters

 

# 00281TXT03ENGE
ISBN 0-978-0-86612-285-6 © 2006; 16 chapters , Softbound

Author: David M. Stipanuk

 

 

IV. COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

23.    Assignments     / Class Exams                           20 %

24.    Comprehensive Final Exam                              80 %                         

 

V. EVALUATION/PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Course grades will be assigned as follows:

 

A+

95 - 100

B-

70 - 74

A

90 - 94

C+

65 - 69

A-

85 - 89

C

60 - 64

B+

80 - 84

C-

59 - 55

B

75 - 79

D

50 - 54

F

< 49

 

 

Course Outline

FMD 281Hospitality Facilities Management and Design

 

This Program is divided into 15 weeks. Each week includes the following :

 

Week 1                      The Role, Cost, and Management of Hospitality Facilities

 

Week 2                      Hospitality Facilities Management Tools, Techniques, and Trends

 

Week 3                      Environmental and Sustainability Management

 

Week 4                      Safety and Security Systems

 

Week 5                      Water and Wastewater Systems

 

Week 6                      Electrical Systems

 

Week 7                      Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning Systems

 

Week 8                      Lighting Systems

 

Week 9                      Laundry Systems

 

Week 10                   Food Service Equipment

 

Week 11                   Building Structure, Finishes, and Site

 

Week 12                   Lodging Planning and Design

 

Week 13                   Food Service Planning and Design

Week 14 

 

Week 15                   Renovation and Capital Projects